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OTTAWA – The Canadian economy marked a major milestone last month as employment returned to pre-pandemic levels for the first time, recouping the remainder of the three million jobs lost more than a year with a gain of 157,000 jobs in September.

September’s earnings were prevalent and concentrated in full-time work, with notable gains in industries where many workers continue to work remotely. Some public sector gains were tied to the September 20 federal election.

Employment for hard-core women, those between 25 and 54, finally resumed at the start of the school year, months after suffering a disproportionate burden of job losses in what has been dubbed “secession.” “.

With the bumpy return of last year’s historic drop in employment comes some caveats, with economists warning that we’re not clear yet.

While the unemployment rate hit 6.9% last month, down from 7.1% in August, the number of unemployed Canadians remains above pre-pandemic levels. The rate would have been 8.9% in September, down from 9.1% in August, if the agency had included in the calculations Canadians who wanted to work but were not looking for work.

The rebound to pre-pandemic levels also ignores population growth and where the country would have been absent from the shock of COVID-19. Statistics Canada has estimated that the economy will need 110,000 to 270,000 additional jobs to close this gap.

Brendon Bernard, senior economist at employment site Indeed, said this second milestone will likely be reached next year.

Some high-contact sectors such as retail trade, which lost 20,000 jobs in September, and accommodation and food services, which experienced their first decline in five months as 27,000 jobs were lost, remain more away from pre-pandemic levels despite easing restrictions.

“Ultimately, it is the pandemic that will decide when these sectors can fully regain their full health,” said BMO Chief Economist Douglas Porter.

“Although today is a cause for celebration, we must keep in mind that not all sectors, all regions have fully recovered by all means. The work is not done. “

The number of long-term unemployed without a job for six months or more changed little last month at 389,000, more than double the number recorded in February 2020.

Leah Nord, senior director of workforce strategies at the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, said there is little information as to why these workers are not successful in their ongoing job search.

“Let’s analyze that and take a look at this political toolkit beyond what we have done today, which is, make no mistake, necessary during the pandemic. But to bring us to recovery, what must we do? “

Anthony Mantione, senior economist at the Labor Market Information Council, said one reason could be a skills mismatch with available jobs. He suggested that focusing efforts on the long-term unemployed could be beneficial as they make up a quarter of all unemployed people will have more difficulty finding a job the longer they are unemployed.

Friday’s jobs report was released two weeks before a series of federal supports expired on October 23. Trudeau’s Liberals are in a rush to reshape and extend the measures for another month, with the minority government politically pressured by the NDP not to reduce support.

Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland this week spoke of more targeted trade supports to lagging sectors like tourism. Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough said the government would provide support to workers who need it on Friday.

“As Canadians are back to work and the recovery is underway across the country, we know the fourth wave is here and has hit some areas harder than others. At the same time, some sectors of the economy continue to face challenges, ”she said. in a report.

“That’s why our emergency supports are always there for Canadians and Canadian businesses who need them.

Likewise, the Bank of Canada has about two weeks to decide what to do with its stimulus package before its next interest rate announcement on October 27.

The central bank has been tracking the number of jobs in its deliberations over the trajectory of its policy rate and bond buying programs that aim to encourage low interest rates and boost consumer spending.

Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem said on Thursday that the frictions in the labor market stemmed from the unique circumstances of the pandemic, with some workers unwilling to return for health concerns, while the responsibilities for childcare can hold back others.

“What we see here is that it is more complicated to open the economy than to close it, and this process by which companies find workers and workers find the right jobs takes some time,” Macklem said.

He also said the central bank was tracking wage growth so that it did not become an independent driver of inflation, which exceeded the bank’s target.

Statistics Canada said wages were up 1.7% year-over-year in September and 4.6% from 2019, a pace Porter noted was good, but not strong.

CIBC chief economist Royce Mendes said September’s employment figures likely seal the deal that the Bank of Canada will further step up the pace of its bond buying program during the announces hourly rates on October 27.

Here is a snapshot of employment in Canada in September (previous month’s figures in brackets):

  • Unemployment rate: 6.9% (7.1)

  • Employment rate: 60.9% (60.5)

  • Participation rate: 65.5% (65.1)

  • Number of unemployed: 1,421,800 (1,440,000)

  • Number of work: 19 131 200 (18 974 100)

  • Youth unemployment rate (15-24 years): 11.3% (11.6)

  • Unemployment rate for men (25 years and over): 6.4% (6.6)

  • Unemployment rate for women (25 years and over): 5.9% (6.0)

Here are last month’s unemployment rates by province (previous month’s figures in brackets):

  • Newfoundland and Labrador 13.1 percent (12.1)

  • Prince Edward Island 11.3% (10.6)

  • Nova Scotia 8.0 percent (7.8)

  • New Brunswick 9.3 percent (9.3)

  • Quebec 5.7% (5.8)

  • Ontario 7.3 percent (7.6)

  • Manitoba 5.6 percent (5.7)

  • Saskatchewan 6.3 percent (7.0)

  • Alberta 8.1 percent (7.9)

  • British Columbia 5.9% (6.2)

Statistics Canada also released seasonally adjusted three-month moving average unemployment rates for major cities. He cautions, however, that the numbers can fluctuate considerably because they are based on small statistical samples. Here are last month’s unemployment rates by city (previous month’s figures in brackets):

  • St. John’s, NL 6.3% (6.9)

  • Halifax 7.0 percent (7.5)

  • Moncton, NB 6.4 percent (6.0)

  • Saint John, NB 8.7% (8.7)

  • Saguenay, Que. 5.3 percent (5.5)

  • Quebec 4.1 percent (4.4)

  • Sherbrooke, Que. 4.5 percent (5.2)

  • Trois-Rivières, Que. 5.1 percent (5.0)

  • Montreal 6.7 percent (7.0)

  • Gatineau, Que. 4.4 percent (5.2)

  • Ottawa 5.9 percent (6.5)

  • Kingston, Ont. 7.2 percent (7.2)

  • Peterborough, Ont. 6.6 percent (6.2)

  • Oshawa, Ont. 7.6 percent (8.3)

  • Toronto 8.9 percent (9.3)

  • Hamilton, Ont. 6.3 percent (7.0)

  • St. Catharines-Niagara, Ont. 8.2 percent (10.5)

  • Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo, Ont. 7.2 percent (7.0)

  • Brantford, Ont. 6.1 percent (5.7)

  • Guelph, Ont. 6.0 percent (7.2)

  • London, Ont. 7.3 percent (7.8)

  • Windsor, Ont. 10.4 percent (10.6)

  • Barrie, Ont. 6.2 percent (7.1)

  • Greater Sudbury, Ont. 8.4 percent (8.7)

  • Thunder Bay, Ont. 6.3 percent (6.0)

  • Winnipeg 6.4 percent (7.1)

  • Regina 6.1 percent (6.2)

  • Saskatoon 7.8% (8.1)

  • Calgary 8.9 percent (9.6)

  • Edmonton 8.2 percent (8.2)

  • Kelowna, BC 5.4% (5.7)

  • Abbotsford-Mission, BC 6.9% (5.9)

  • Vancouver 6.7 percent (7.2)

  • Victoria 4.2 percent (4.2)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on October 8, 2021


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OTTAWA – The Canadian economy reached a milestone last month as employment returned to pre-pandemic levels for the first time, recouping the remainder of the three million jobs lost more than a year with a gain of 157,000 jobs in September.

September’s earnings were prevalent and concentrated in full-time work, with notable gains in industries where many workers continue to work remotely. Some public sector gains were tied to the September 20 federal election.

Employment for hard-core women, those between 25 and 54, finally resumed at the start of the school year, months after suffering a disproportionate burden of job losses in what has been dubbed “secession.” “.

With the bumpy return of last year’s historic drop in employment comes some caveats, with economists warning that we’re not clear yet.

While the unemployment rate hit 6.9% last month, down from 7.1% in August, the number of unemployed Canadians remains above pre-pandemic levels. The rate would have been 8.9% in September, down from 9.1% in August, if the agency had included in the calculations Canadians who wanted to work but were not looking for work.

The rebound to pre-pandemic levels also ignores population growth and where the country would have been absent from the shock of COVID-19. Statistics Canada has estimated that the economy will need 110,000 to 270,000 additional jobs to close this gap.

Brendon Bernard, senior economist at employment site Indeed, said this second milestone will likely be reached next year.

Some high-contact sectors such as retail trade, which lost 20,000 jobs in September, and accommodation and food services, which experienced their first decline in five months as 27,000 jobs were lost, remain more away from pre-pandemic levels despite easing restrictions.

“Ultimately, it is the pandemic that will decide when these sectors can fully regain their full health,” said BMO Chief Economist Douglas Porter.

“Although today is a cause for celebration, we must keep in mind that not all sectors, all regions have fully recovered by all means. The work is not done. “

The number of long-term unemployed without a job for six months or more changed little last month at 389,000, more than double the number recorded in February 2020.

Leah Nord, senior director of workforce strategies at the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, said there is little information as to why these workers are not successful in their ongoing job search.

“Let’s analyze that and take a look at this political toolkit beyond what we have done today, which is, make no mistake, necessary during the pandemic. But to bring us to recovery, what must we do? “

Anthony Mantione, senior economist at the Labor Market Information Council, said one reason could be a skills mismatch with available jobs. He suggested that focusing efforts on the long-term unemployed could be beneficial, as they make up a quarter of all unemployed people will have more difficulty finding a job the longer they are unemployed.

Friday’s jobs report was released two weeks before a series of federal supports expired on October 23. Trudeau’s Liberals are in a rush to reshape and extend the measures for another month, with the minority government politically pressured by the NDP not to reduce support.

Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland this week spoke of more targeted trade supports to lagging sectors like tourism. Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough said the government would provide support to workers who need it on Friday.

“As Canadians are back to work and the recovery is underway across the country, we know the fourth wave is here and has hit some areas harder than others. At the same time, some sectors of the economy continue to face challenges, ”she said. in a report.

“That’s why our emergency supports are always there for Canadians and Canadian businesses who need them.

Likewise, the Bank of Canada has about two weeks to decide what to do with its stimulus package before its next interest rate announcement on October 27.

The central bank has been following the employment figures in deliberations over its policy rate path and bond buying programs that aim to encourage low interest rates and boost consumer spending.

Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem said on Thursday that the frictions in the labor market stemmed from the unique circumstances of the pandemic, with some workers unwilling to return for health concerns, while the responsibilities for childcare can hold back others.

“What we see here is that it is more complicated to open the economy than to close it, and this process by which companies find workers and workers find the right jobs takes some time,” Macklem said.

He also said the central bank was tracking wage growth so that it did not become an independent driver of inflation, which exceeded the bank’s target.

Statistics Canada said wages were up 1.7% year-over-year in September and 4.6% from 2019, a pace according to Porter that was good, but not strong.

CIBC chief economist Royce Mendes said September’s employment figures likely seal the deal that the Bank of Canada will further step up the pace of its bond buying program during the announces hourly rates on October 27.

Here is a snapshot of employment in Canada in September (previous month’s figures in brackets):

  • Unemployment rate: 6.9% (7.1)

  • Employment rate: 60.9% (60.5)

  • Participation rate: 65.5% (65.1)

  • Number of unemployed: 1,421,800 (1,440,000)

  • Number of work: 19 131 200 (18 974 100)

  • Youth unemployment rate (15-24 years): 11.3% (11.6)

  • Unemployment rate for men (25 years and over): 6.4% (6.6)

  • Unemployment rate for women (25 years and over): 5.9% (6.0)

Here are last month’s unemployment rates by province (previous month’s figures in brackets):

  • Newfoundland and Labrador 13.1 percent (12.1)

  • Prince Edward Island 11.3% (10.6)

  • Nova Scotia 8.0 percent (7.8)

  • New Brunswick 9.3 percent (9.3)

  • Quebec 5.7% (5.8)

  • Ontario 7.3 percent (7.6)

  • Manitoba 5.6 percent (5.7)

  • Saskatchewan 6.3 percent (7.0)

  • Alberta 8.1 percent (7.9)

  • British Columbia 5.9% (6.2)

Statistics Canada also released seasonally adjusted three-month moving average unemployment rates for major cities. He cautions, however, that the numbers can fluctuate considerably because they are based on small statistical samples. Here are last month’s unemployment rates by city (previous month’s figures in brackets):

  • St. John’s, NL 6.3% (6.9)

  • Halifax 7.0 percent (7.5)

  • Moncton, NB 6.4 percent (6.0)

  • Saint John, NB 8.7% (8.7)

  • Saguenay, Que. 5.3 percent (5.5)

  • Quebec 4.1 percent (4.4)

  • Sherbrooke, Que. 4.5 percent (5.2)

  • Trois-Rivières, Que. 5.1 percent (5.0)

  • Montreal 6.7 percent (7.0)

  • Gatineau, Que. 4.4 percent (5.2)

  • Ottawa 5.9 percent (6.5)

  • Kingston, Ont. 7.2 percent (7.2)

  • Peterborough, Ont. 6.6 percent (6.2)

  • Oshawa, Ont. 7.6 percent (8.3)

  • Toronto 8.9 percent (9.3)

  • Hamilton, Ont. 6.3 percent (7.0)

  • St. Catharines-Niagara, Ont. 8.2 percent (10.5)

  • Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo, Ont. 7.2 percent (7.0)

  • Brantford, Ont. 6.1 percent (5.7)

  • Guelph, Ont. 6.0 percent (7.2)

  • London, Ont. 7.3 percent (7.8)

  • Windsor, Ont. 10.4 percent (10.6)

  • Barrie, Ont. 6.2 percent (7.1)

  • Greater Sudbury, Ont. 8.4 percent (8.7)

  • Thunder Bay, Ont. 6.3 percent (6.0)

  • Winnipeg 6.4 percent (7.1)

  • Regina 6.1 percent (6.2)

  • Saskatoon 7.8% (8.1)

  • Calgary 8.9 percent (9.6)

  • Edmonton 8.2 percent (8.2)

  • Kelowna, BC 5.4% (5.7)

  • Abbotsford-Mission, BC 6.9% (5.9)

  • Vancouver 6.7 percent (7.2)

  • Victoria 4.2 percent (4.2)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on October 8, 2021


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OTTAWA –

Statistics Canada says the economy created 157,000 jobs in September, returning employment to pre-pandemic levels for the first time.

The unemployment rate fell to 6.9% from 7.1% in August.

According to Statistics Canada, the unemployment rate would have been 8.9% in September, down from 9.1% in August, if it had included in the calculations Canadians who wanted to work but were not looking for work.

The last time Canada experienced such a significant job gain was in June 2021, when the economy created 231,000 jobs.

The statistics agency says job gains were widespread, but concentrated in full-time work and evenly distributed between the public and private sectors. Gains have also been notable in industries where many workers continue to work remotely.

Yet the ranks of the long-term unemployed who have been out of work for six months or more remained little changed in the past month and were still double the number recorded in February 2020.

Leah Nord, senior director of workforce strategies at the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, says the fact that nearly 400,000 Canadians are long-term unemployed should put all the celebrations on hold, especially without data to explain why they haven’t been able to join the workforce in months.

“Canadians want to work, most are not unemployed by choice, so we need to dig in and find out exactly what is holding them back so that we can make evidence-based decisions,” she said in a statement.

“Our full economic recovery depends on it.”

Retail employment also fell by 20,000 in September, bringing employment in the sector to less than 71,000 jobs, or 3.1%, from its February 2020 level. Statistics Canada notes that despite the Loosening of restrictions across Canada, employment in the industry has been at about the same level since June.

A similar story has occurred in the hard-hit accommodation and food industry, which experienced its first decline in five months, with 27,000 jobs being lost after gaining 211,000 positions between May and August.

The statistics agency also notes that the employment rate remains just below the pre-pandemic figure, reflecting the fact that job growth has not matched population growth over the 19 last months.

CIBC chief economist Royce Mendes said the month’s headlines likely sealed the Bank of Canada’s deal to further ease the pace of its bond buying program later this month .

He adds that there is still some way to go to completely clean up the labor market.

Here is a snapshot of employment in Canada in September (previous month’s figures in brackets):

  • Unemployment rate: 6.9% (7.1)
  • Employment rate: 60.9% (60.5)
  • Participation rate: 65.5% (65.1)
  • Number of unemployed: 1,421,800 (1,440,000)
  • Number of work: 19 131 200 (18 974 100)
  • Youth unemployment rate (15-24 years): 11.3% (11.6)
  • Unemployment rate for men (25 years and over): 6.4% (6.6)
  • Unemployment rate for women (25 years and over): 5.9% (6.0)

Here are last month’s unemployment rates by province (previous month’s figures in brackets):

  • Newfoundland and Labrador 13.1 percent (12.1)
  • Prince Edward Island 11.3% (10.6)
  • Nova Scotia 8.0 percent (7.8)
  • New Brunswick 9.3 percent (9.3)
  • Quebec 5.7% (5.8)
  • Ontario 7.3 percent (7.6)
  • Manitoba 5.6 percent (5.7)
  • Saskatchewan 6.3 percent (7.0)
  • Alberta 8.1 percent (7.9)
  • British Columbia 5.9% (6.2)

Statistics Canada also released seasonally adjusted three-month moving average unemployment rates for major cities. He cautions, however, that the numbers can fluctuate considerably because they are based on small statistical samples. Here are last month’s unemployment rates by city (previous month’s figures in brackets):

  • St. John’s, NL 6.3% (6.9)
  • Halifax 7.0 percent (7.5)
  • Moncton, NB 6.4 percent (6.0)
  • Saint John, NB 8.7% (8.7)
  • Saguenay, Que. 5.3 percent (5.5)
  • Quebec 4.1 percent (4.4)
  • Sherbrooke, Que. 4.5 percent (5.2)
  • Trois-Rivières, Que. 5.1 percent (5.0)
  • Montreal 6.7 percent (7.0)
  • Gatineau, Que. 4.4 percent (5.2)
  • Ottawa 5.9 percent (6.5)
  • Kingston, Ont. 7.2 percent (7.2)
  • Peterborough, Ont. 6.6 percent (6.2)
  • Oshawa, Ont. 7.6 percent (8.3)
  • Toronto 8.9 percent (9.3)
  • Hamilton, Ont. 6.3 percent (7.0)
  • St. Catharines-Niagara, Ont. 8.2 percent (10.5)
  • Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo, Ont. 7.2 percent (7.0)
  • Brantford, Ont. 6.1 percent (5.7)
  • Guelph, Ont. 6.0 percent (7.2)
  • London, Ont. 7.3 percent (7.8)
  • Windsor, Ont. 10.4 percent (10.6)
  • Barrie, Ont. 6.2 percent (7.1)
  • Greater Sudbury, Ont. 8.4 percent (8.7)
  • Thunder Bay, Ont. 6.3 percent (6.0)
  • Winnipeg 6.4 percent (7.1)
  • Regina 6.1 percent (6.2)
  • Saskatoon 7.8% (8.1)
  • Calgary 8.9 percent (9.6)
  • Edmonton 8.2 percent (8.2)
  • Kelowna, BC 5.4% (5.7)
  • Abbotsford-Mission, BC 6.9% (5.9)
  • Vancouver 6.7 percent (7.2)
  • Victoria 4.2 percent (4.2)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on October 8, 2021


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Job hunting can be exhausting if you do it the traditional way and more exhausting, especially if you are new to the field. You apply for all positions and wait to hear from companies, only to get regret or no response. Some people give up their job search and start pretending that there is no job. Don’t give up yet without trying this option; looking for a Scarborough employment agency to put you in touch with an employer.

Recruitment consultants act as connectors from job seekers to employers. Companies present them with vacancies to find them a suitable employee, which means they have access to plenty of vacancies. However, there are many recruitment agencies that can help you find a job in Scarborough. However, you may face a challenge in choosing one. These tips will help you in the search.

What you need to know about the consultant before choosing him

a. How long have they been in service

When choosing an employment agency in Scarborough, you should ask them how long it has been in business. The number of years matters a lot when it comes to experience, and nothing beats experience. The longer they have been in business, the more experienced they are and the better they will be able to help you find a position.

b. Look for them online

Find their website and search for them online. Take a look at their LinkedIn and Facebook accounts and check out how they described themselves on their website. Scroll down to see customer reviews. Reviews are essential because they help you know how the business relates to and treats its customers. Are there any complaints? How many negative comments versus the positive ones? And how did the company respond to complaints?

vs. How will the company hold you accountable during your research?

Will you be in contact with your recruiter, even if they are the ones who put you in touch with the employer? Or your job is finished after submitting the CV. It is crucial to stay in touch with the recruiter to find out how the process is going. Keeping in touch will also help you see the type of employer you will be dealing with and the company in which you will be working.

D. Ask for the contacts of job seekers with whom they have worked

Getting someone else’s information will help you know if you are making a good choice with the recruiter or they will be wasting your time. Ask other job seekers about their experience with the recruiter in question. Find out about the challenges they encountered and whether the recruiting business was helpful.

e. How much are they interested in knowing about you?

Does the Scarborough Employment Agency want to know who you are, your career goals and the target role you are aiming for? Knowing that your recruiter is ready to get to know you is essential because they can advise you accordingly. They can also put you in touch with the roles that interest you and tell you how to improve your CV. This will be very helpful in your job search, because by improving your CV, you will become more attractive to employers.

F. How will they help you through the hiring process?

Your main goal when contacting the recruiting firm is to get a job. There are many processes that you will go through until you are recruited, and these will be easier if you have someone to help you go through the processes. Knowing whether the Scarborough Employment Office will help you through the entire recruitment process, including preparing for an interview, reduces anxiety. They should help you understand how to dress for the interview and how to answer questions.

g. The recruiter should help you negotiate an offer

Another important thing to keep in mind in a recruiting business is its ability to help you negotiate offers. When a company makes you an offer, the Scarborough employment agency should speak to them on your behalf about wages and working conditions. It will also make it easier for you when you join the new firm. The team should also notify you if the offer is not good.


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TOWNSHIP, Mich., September 30, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Fraza, an end-to-end material handling solutions provider, today announced the new member of its Human Resources team, Christen Powers. Powers will assume the role of Director of Human Resources and will work closely with Fraza’s department heads to foster employee development and engagement.

“We are delighted to have Christen on our team,” said Roger runyan, CEO of Fraza and Vitan Equipment. “Our employees embody our mission to be the best service organization, period. It was important for me to have a HR manager like Christen who values ​​employee culture, engagement and well-being. His experience and expertise will ensure that these values ​​are at the forefront of our HR initiatives. “

Prior to Fraza, Powers worked at Minth North America (Director of Human Resources) and MAT Holdings (Vice President, Human Resources), and has experience in strategic human resources. In her previous roles, Ms. Powers has focused on culture transformation to improve employee engagement and satisfaction, succession development and career planning, and a restructuring of benefits. Powers brings with her over 20 years of human resources experience.

As the Director of Human Resources at Fraza, Powers looks forward to fostering the development of Fraza employees through a welcoming onboarding process, career planning and development, training and overall engagement to ensure a positive working environment.

“I look forward to supporting Fraza’s goals and mission, while engaging our team and helping our employees navigate their career development within our organization,” said Powers. “I am delighted to see how much we will accomplish over the next few years.”

About Fraza

Fraza is to the southeast that of Michigan The fastest growing material handling and facilities management provider committed to providing customers with excellent customer service, experienced technicians, and the most advanced technology in the industry. Fraza offers new and used forklifts and other material handling equipment; parts and service for any make or model of equipment; dock and gate products and services; rentals; warehouse and related industrial supplies; batteries and chargers; and operator training. Fraza also serves as Metro Detroit’s Overhead Door CompanyMT. In business since 1938, Fraza has four full-service branches in Canton, Sterling heights, Bridgeport, and Grand Rapids. Learn more at frazagroup.com, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube.

View original content to download multimedia: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fraza-hires-christen-powers-to-drive-employee-development-and-engagement-301389310.html

SOURCE Fraza


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“We are delighted to have Christen on our team,” said Roger runyan, CEO of Fraza and Vitan Equipment. “Our employees embody our mission to be the best service organization, period. It was important for me to have a HR manager like Christen who values ​​employee culture, engagement and well-being. His experience and expertise will ensure that these values ​​are at the forefront of our HR initiatives. “

Prior to Fraza, Powers worked at Minth North America (Director of Human Resources) and MAT Holdings (Vice President, Human Resources), and has experience in strategic human resources. In her previous roles, Ms. Powers has focused on culture transformation to improve employee engagement and satisfaction, succession development and career planning, and a restructuring of benefits. Powers brings with her over 20 years of human resources experience.

As the Director of Human Resources at Fraza, Powers looks forward to fostering the development of Fraza employees through a welcoming onboarding process, career planning and development, training and overall engagement to ensure a positive working environment.

“I look forward to supporting Fraza’s goals and mission, while engaging our team and helping our employees navigate their career development within our organization,” said Powers. “I am delighted to see how much we will accomplish over the next few years.”

About Fraza

Fraza is to the southeast that of Michigan The fastest growing material handling and facilities management provider committed to providing customers with excellent customer service, experienced technicians, and the most advanced technology in the industry. Fraza offers new and used forklifts and other material handling equipment; parts and service for any make or model of equipment; dock and gate products and services; rentals; warehouse and related industrial supplies; batteries and chargers; and operator training. Fraza also serves as Metro Detroit’s Overhead Door CompanyMT. In business since 1938, Fraza has four full-service branches in Canton, Sterling heights, Bridgeport, and Grand Rapids. Learn more at frazagroup.com, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube.

SOURCE Fraza

Related links

https://www.frazagroup.com


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Activision Blizzard has just released a press release stating that it has reached an agreement to settle the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission lawsuit that has just been revealed. It states in part:

Under the agreement… Activision Blizzard has committed to create an $ 18 million ($ 25) fund to compensate and repair eligible claimants. Any unspent amounts for applicants will be distributed among charities that advance women in the video game industry or promote awareness of harassment and gender issues as well as diversity initiatives, corporate equity and inclusion, as endorsed by the EEOC. The agreement is subject to court approval.

The release also includes a statement from CEO Bobby Kotick:

There is nowhere in our company for discrimination, harassment or unequal treatment of any kind, and I am grateful to the employees who courageously shared their experiences. I apologize that anyone has experienced inappropriate conduct, and I remain steadfast in my commitment to making Activision Blizzard one of the most inclusive, respected and respectful workplaces in the world.

Kotick, of course, receives $ 154 million ($ 211 million) in effective compensation in 2021, which means he could easily cover the $ 18 million ($ 25) million cost of settling the EEOC lawsuit. Many times.

The original story follows.

Another federal agency, the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), is now suing Call of Duty and World of warcraft publisher Activision Blizzard.

Recently released court documents shed light on the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission complaint, which was referenced last week by CEO Bobby Kotick in a press release to investors. This new EEOC complaint focuses on allegations of gender-based discrimination and harassment at Activision Blizzard, one of the world’s largest video game publishers, and follows last week’s announcement according to which the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is currently investigating the company and its CEO. .

Last week it became publicly known that the EEOC was investigating Activision Blizzard to some extent thanks to Kotick disclosing that the company “continues to productively engage with regulators,” including the EEOC, in a press release for investors. This press release was issued in response to a different and large-scale investigation by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. The publisher and even Kotick himself have been subpoenaed as a result of this ongoing legal investigation.

Documents released today confirm that the EEOC is indeed suing the game publisher and associated parties for multiple allegations of gender-based discrimination and harassment. According to court documents, Activision Blizzard and King Games are directly named in the lawsuit along with 10 currently anonymous individuals who likely work or have worked at both companies. The EEOC notes that it may amend the document to name these currently unknown individuals at a later date.

As spotted by The edge, the EEOC complaint states that it informed Activision Blizzard of its findings on June 15. But it turns out that he began his investigation in September 2018. “In-depth conciliation discussions” followed with Activision. But the EEOC has been unable to secure any sort of “acceptable conciliation agreement” through these “more informal methods,” so now it is suing and seeking a jury trial on the allegations uncovered during its investigation.

Image: Activision

This is just the latest in a series of legal issues facing the big publisher.

Activision Blizzard’s public legal troubles began in July when he was sued by the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing after a multi-year investigation uncovered stories of several women experiencing continued harassment and abuse while they were working in the company. This disclosure led several executives to apologize or even quit the struggling publisher. At the same time, Blizzard games that contain references to the names of suspected attackers are cleaned up by the developers to remove those references from the live games.

Investors filed a second lawsuit against the publisher in August, which related to when Activision Blizzard disclosed its ongoing issues of sexual harassment and discrimination.

The ongoing fallout from the California lawsuit and more recent legal complaints have led current employees to step down, with more stories of workplace abuse becoming public, with gamers and streamers boycotting games like World of warcraft, and more high-level employees leaving the company, such as Overwatch 2 ′executive producer.

In that investor press release issued on September 21, in which Kotick first mentioned a new EEOC complaint, Kotick said the company “continues to work with regulators to address and resolve complaints at the venue. of work she received “. Meanwhile, California accused the publisher of shredding evidence of abuse and failing to cooperate with the investigation.


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Does your business need short-term help during a peak period? Are you short of staff and need a permanent employee? Are you looking for people to work in your office or to work from home?

Talent management solutions come in all sizes: contract, seasonal, permanent, contract-to-permanent, project-based, remote, on-site, one employee, an entire team – the best recruiting strategy can also be unique. as the needs of each business. A top-notch employment agency prioritizes these needs.

They also give you quick access to highly trained professionals that you might not find on your own. And they do the heavy lifting with hiring, alleviating your workload – and stress load – and providing the peace of mind that no details about the new hire will slip through the cracks and no of your important projects will only be delayed while you sift through resumes.

So how do employment agencies work – and how can you work with them more effectively? Here are five tips to optimize your experience:

1. Hire a specialized employment agency

When outsourcing the hiring process to recruiting professionals, make sure the agency specializes in the type of staff you need, whether for accounting, marketing, or other roles. of your company. Non-specialist or generalist companies work with a wide variety of candidates. This makes it harder and longer to find someone with the exact skills and qualifications you need than if you were working with a company focused on your field – and who probably already knows at least a few candidates who could be successful in your field. Vacancy.

In addition, companies specializing in talent management solutions have a better idea of ​​the candidate market in your industry and can effectively assess candidate experience and skills. Getting a good match the first time saves you time and money.

Robert Half has supported companies in their recruitments since 1948. Let us help you.

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2. Communication is the key

Try speaking directly to a hiring manager rather than communicating only by email. They’ll ask you questions about your hiring needs and how long you’ll need extra help, whether it’s for a week or for a permanent position.

Make sure you create a job description that completely describes the job responsibilities so that your agency knows what skills the candidate should have. Your recruiter can help, and we’ve put together a plan to create a job description that can streamline the process.

Also mention any policies your business follows, such as dress code, remote working, working hours – including how you handle overtime – and breaks. These details help your representative get a sense of your corporate culture and the type of professional who is likely to be successful in your business. When you feel that you have clearly defined your needs, the recruiter immediately launches the search.

From there, the employment agency will post your job posting, review resumes, conduct initial assessments of applicants over the phone, negotiate salary and benefits based on your parameters, perform background checks , etc. All you need to do is conduct in-person or video interviews and pick your best candidate.

3. Get ready, get set …

A good recruiter doesn’t stop when you hire. Agencies like Robert Half can help you with your onboarding checklist so that your office and teams are ready to welcome your newcomer, whether permanent or contract. Simple tips include making sure space, equipment, email, and other basics are ready before the employee’s first day. But there is more you can do to help new people feel like part of the team from the start:

  • Ensure a smooth start by providing guidance, even for contract workers. Make all appropriate team introductions and designate a contact person for any questions that may arise.

  • Be inclusive and encourage team bonding by inviting the new worker to staff functions such as lunches, team meetings, and other group discussions. This is especially important for remote employees, who can participate by video conference.

  • Communicate with your new staff members, as well as those with whom they interact, to assess how they fit into the team. While contract workers have the skills for the job, it’s also important to adapt well to your corporate culture.

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4. Follow-up with the employment agency

Providing feedback on the new worker to your Talent Solutions Representative assists you and the recruiter in any future talent searches. Immediately notify the agency if there is a problem and let the recruiter know the specific aspects of the individual’s performance that stood out, positively or not.

5. Weigh the costs against the costs

For you, the client, there are costs associated with using an employment agency, but the overall cost is usually a net savings for you if you choose the right company, especially in the long run. Finding qualified and knowledgeable employees can be complicated and time consuming, so you save time, money and potential frustration by outsourcing this process to recruiting experts.

In addition, the most reputable employment agencies are likely to offer a satisfaction guarantee. So if you are not happy with the worker, the company will find a replacement. And if you build a relationship with the agency, not only does your savings add up over time, but you also have a trusted solution that you can trust when hiring.

Now that you can answer the question of how employment agencies work, be sure to communicate your goals and needs to recruiters every step of the way. This will put you in the best position to maximize your working relationship with them.


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Israeli startup GrowthSpace, which has developed a platform for employee development programs, said on Wednesday it had secured a $ 15 million Series A investment round. The funding was co-led by M12, Microsoft’s venture capital fund, and Vertex Ventures. This latest round of funding, which also included former investor M-Fund Club, brings the total amount raised by GrowthSpace to $ 19 million.

GrowthSpace has developed technology that provides a personalized development program for employees. The system connects employees and experts after understanding their business goals and professional challenges. The company said it has more than 1,000 coaches, mentors and professionals speaking a variety of languages ​​and with expertise in 300 different skills. The business model of the company is based on an annual subscription which includes a certain number of credits, each credit being equal to a personalized development program for an employee which includes 5 to 7 meetings with an expert. The cost per credit decreases as the subscription program grows.

Co-founders of GrowthSpace. Photo: Doron Letzer

GrowthSpace currently has nearly 100 clients and has experienced significant growth following the move to remote working. Customers include Intel, Applied Materials, Check Point, Johnson & Johnson, Nespresso, Gainsight and Taboola.

The company employs 30 people in Israel, the United States and Canada, but they are not based in any local office and work remotely.

GrowthSpace was founded in 2019 by Omer Glass, CEO, Dan Terner, COO, and Izhak Kedar, CTO.


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There were 44,000 more men and 59,000 women employed last month compared to August 2020.

Image: Silja Viitala / Yle


The employment rate trend in Finland reached 72.8% in August, according to Statistics Finland’s latest labor force survey, with 104,000 more people in employment compared to the same month last year.

This is a very slight improvement from the figures for July, when the rate hit 72.7%. It was then the highest level since February 2020, when the coronavirus pandemic began to affect the Finnish economy.

The latest increase equates to 59,000 more female employees and 44,000 more male employees, data from the agency’s calculation of the figures revealed.

The latest figures also show that there were 33,000 fewer unemployed this year compared to August 2020, with the unemployment rate falling to 7.6%.

At the end of August, a total of 281,000 people were registered as job seekers in national employment and economic development offices or in local authority pilot projects.

The regions of Ostrobothnia, Southern Ostrobothnia and Pirkanmaa recorded the largest declines in unemployment, while Kainuu, Central Finland, Häme and Uusimaa recorded only very small declines in the local unemployment rate.

Employers’ group predicts labor shortages

Despite the latest increase in the employment rate, pressure group Technology Industries of Finland noted in a press release that Finland will face a shortage of skilled labor over the next decade, which could nullify the benefits of expected economic growth.

As an example, the group cited a recent report which found that the tech industry will need 130,000 skilled specialists over the next decade, or about 13,300 per year.

Many sub-sectors, including metal processing and information technology, will need to recruit skilled workers – the majority from abroad – to bridge the gap caused by Finland’s aging population. If this does not happen, the group noted, the rate of economic growth will not be sustained.

“The indisputable fact is that due to an aging population and low birth rates, the working age population will decline sharply in the years to come and there will not be enough workers in all sectors.” , said the executive vice president. Minna Helle written in the press release. “If we want to ensure economic growth, social services and standard of living, our only option is to facilitate labor migration in different ways – and quickly. “

Yle News’ All Points North podcast looked at the challenges faced by skilled workers coming to Finland. You can listen to the full podcast using the built-in player here, via Yle arena, Spotify Where Apple podcasts or on your usual podcast player using the RSS feed.


Audio: News from Yle


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